Sneezing? Sniffling? 'Cedar fever' may be to blame - KTEN.com - Texoma news, weather and sports

Sneezing? Sniffling? 'Cedar fever' may be to blame

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SHERMAN, Texas -- It's "cedar fever" time across Texoma.

Commonly confused with flu, cedar fever does not result in high temperatures, but it does bring misery to allergy-sufferers.

"You'll have a lot of congestion, runny nose, a lot of pain in your ears ... lot of drainage, productive cough," said Dr. Alex Roby of Red River ER.

The mountain cedar (or juniper) is an evergreen tree that grows wild in the Texas Hill Country. But with southerly winds in the forecast, North Texas and Texoma are expecting the pollen from those trees to blow our way.

"Cedar is a very hardy tree, very difficult to get rid of, and it produces some really nasty pollen," Roby said.  "A lot of people suffer from severe allergies to cedar, creating what's called 'cedar fever,' and it typically flares up about this time of year."

According to Pollen.com, Sherman's allergy index is at medium-high, and is forecast to rise through the week, peaking at high levels on Thursday and Friday.

Dr. Roby said it's important to know how to properly take care of yourself when under the weather. You could even be making a simple error in your medicine. Allergy victims often grab nasal sprays or saline sprays to help.

"The structures you're trying to target are called turbinates, and they're little tonsils for your nose," he said. "They look like fingertips poking in, they're about half an inch to an inch deep in the nose, and so you want the medicine to be deposited there. "If you aim back, now it will deposit where it will do you some good."

Roby said the best trick to keep pollen away when outdoors is to look down at your feet.

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