Grackle migration targets Texoma - KTEN.com - No One Gets You Closer

Grackle migration targets Texoma

Posted: Updated:
Thousands of grackles congregate at the intersection of U.S. 75 and U.S. 82 in Sherman. (KTEN) Thousands of grackles congregate at the intersection of U.S. 75 and U.S. 82 in Sherman. (KTEN)
Businesses in the path of the grackle migration try to take action to minimize their impact. (KTEN) Businesses in the path of the grackle migration try to take action to minimize their impact. (KTEN)

SHERMAN, Texas -- It's a scene straight out of an Alfred Hitchcock thriller: Thousands of noisy birds perched on power lines, signs, buildings and vehicles.

But this is not playing out on a Hollywood sound stage... we're talking about the corner of U.S. 75 and U.S. 82 in Sherman.

Rodney Beaman of Texas Bird Services says this avian assembly is the result of a silver-tailed grackle "plague" as the birds migrate from Canada to Texas for the winter months, and their visits can be harmful to urban and suburban areas.

"It can get bad enough to where the trees actually start getting stressed out because they are covered in so much feces,"  Beaman explained. "Below the trees -- whether it's cars or pedestrians -- it doesn't take much time for these things just to be covered."

The Texas Department of Transportation says 80,000 to 90,000  thousand people travel through this intersection every day, and that's one reason there are so many birds: They are attracted to the warmth generated by the traffic, the pavement, and human activity.

KTEN's Facebook friends shared photos and videos of other sites in North Texas where grackles pause on their long journey.

Texas Bird Services helps businesses and campuses with these birds by pointing lasers at them to encourage them to move on.

Douglas Distributing places realistic statues of owls and sticky glue around their Exxon service station at the corner of 75 and 82 to discourage the unwanted visitors. The Walmart across the street has cut down some trees to help minimize the impact.

But with thousands of birds coming in every day, it is no easy task. If there's a silver lining, it's this: Most of these birds are migratory, and will be moving on by winter.

  • Submit a News Tip

    Do you have a news tip for KTEN?

    Begin by entering your email address in the field below or call 903-548-4010

    * denotes required fields
    We're sorry, but only one entry is allowed per person.
    Thank you for your continued interest.

    Your news tip has been submitted. If you provided contact information, we might use it to reach out to you if additional information is required.